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ideas have consequences

You are here:Home>>Strategic Research & Analysis>>University Of Ghana Removes Gandhi Statue Due to his Racist Past
Friday, 14 December 2018 18:48

University Of Ghana Removes Gandhi Statue Due to his Racist Past

Written by Administrator
Gandhi Statue Gandhi Statue


The gigantic statue of the Indian civil rights leader Mohandas Gandhi  in the middle of University of Ghana campus has finally been removed due to Gandhi past racism towards Africans. Since two years the controversial statute has been installed, there was an uproar and protesting for its removal by the university faculty (lecturers and  students) .




The University of Ghana lecturers opposed to the statue pointed to what they called, Gandhi's "racist identity," highlighting remarks in which he repeatedly referred to native Africans using a slur and indicated that Indians were superior to Africans. Gandhi is famous for leading India's independence movement against the British and for pushing for other reforms across the country, but he spent more than two decades in South Africa working on civil rights issues. A petition from the faculty members also noted that the University of Ghana's campus did not have statues of African heroes and heroines.





"The statue was unveiled in June [2016] by Indian President Shri Pranab Mukherjee during a state visit to Ghana, and professors began rallying against it in September [2016].




A book  written by two South African writers in 2015 pointed to instances where Gandhi complained that Indians were being forced to use the same separate entrances as Africans, meaning “their civilised habits … would be degraded to the habits of aboriginal natives”.




“About the mixing of the Kaffirs with the Indians, I must confess I feel most strongly,” he wrote in a letter in 1904.



"In a statement, Ghana's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it was following the controversy with 'deep concern,' and added: 'While acknowledging that human as he was, Mahatma Gandhi may have had his flaws, we must remember that people evolve. He inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The ministry stressed that the 'unfortunate verbal attack' against Gandhi could potentially 'create disaffection not only at the level of Government relations, but also between people not only in our country but all over the world.' "

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