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ideas have consequences

You are here:Home>>Strategic Research & Analysis>> Geneviev Nnaji ‘s Lionheart rejected by Oscar - It’s the money
Wednesday, 06 November 2019 18:34

Geneviev Nnaji ‘s Lionheart rejected by Oscar - It’s the money

Written by Emeka Chiakwelu
Geneviev  Nnaji Geneviev Nnaji

Afripol- Houston,Tx


Genevieve Nnaji is a brilliant and impressive filmmaker. To be frank I never anticipated from her the level of sophistication and intellectual audacity she has exhibited since her emergence on the global stage. She deserved a lot of credit for rewriting the perception of Nollywood female stars that are more occupied with vanity and carnality.  Her rational compass and worldview are pointing to a new, high quality and energetic Nollywood.



Yes, the movie “Lionheart” directed and stirred in by Genevieve Nnaji was rejected by Oscar for best international movie due to “too much English” conversation. But there were underlying reasons beyond the aforementioned and stipulated reason that propelled the rejection. It’s all about the money and competition.


Although, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which gives Oscar awards, changed and replaced its outdated global category from “foreign language,” to “international feature film.” But the guidelines and criteria for acceptability remained unchanged. Eligible films must come outside the United States and dialogue must be mostly non-English. By this act of commission, Hollywood puts a face of tolerance but simultaneously, intolerance for competition. This is superb thinking and unabashed public relation and capitalism at its best.



For those whose naivety and insularity have precluded them from understanding Hollywood and its Oscar Academy, they must be made to see crystal clear what this entertainment institution is all about. First
and foremost, Hollywood that birthed Academy award is  a business venture that is why it is commonly labeled show business.   Hollywood is in entertainment business to make money and carved out a huge market for its movie industry. Hollywood will do anything within its power to ward off competitors and continues making the largest dividends for its owners and investors.




Hollywood primarily produced English language based movies and any other region of the world be it Nollywood or Bollywood that is also producing overwhelmingly English based movies will  be  dissuaded and discouraged from  sharing the market with Hollywood. The Hollywood gatekeepers maybe sentimental on making movies but they are stern and shrewd business men and women who are in business to win.



Rendering global limelight to movies like “Lionheart” from Nollywood with mostly English based dialogue is a threat to the financial integrity of Hollywood.  The Hollywood gate keepers are shrewd enough to realize that another film institution outside their sphere of control will cut into their profit immensely. It’s all about the money.




Emeka Chiakwelu Chiakwelu, Principal Policy Strategist at AFRIPOL. His works have appeared in Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Forbes and many other important journals around the world. His writings have also been cited in many economic books, publications and many institutions of higher learning including Harvard Education and Oxford University. Africa Political & Economic Strategic Center (AFRIPOL) is foremost a public policy center whose fundamental objective is to broaden the parameters of public policy debates in Africa. To advocate, promote and encourage free enterprise, democracy, sustainable green environment, human rights, conflict resolutions, transparency and probity in Africa. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last modified on Friday, 08 November 2019 16:12

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