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You are here:Home>>Strategic Research & Analysis>>2012 Failed States Index Released : Nigeria, Somalia, Congo etc.
Saturday, 30 June 2012 21:31

2012 Failed States Index Released : Nigeria, Somalia, Congo etc.

Written by The Fund for Peace (FFP)
2012 Failed States Index Released : Nigeria, Somalia, Congo etc. FFP

"Many African countries including   Nigeria, Somalia, Congo, Sudan and others made the list of 2012 Failed States complied by The Fund for Peace (TFP).  Nigeria was ranked among the top 10 failed states in Africa and 14th in the global index of  Failed states." - AFRIPOL

Somalia ranked most troubled state for 5th straight year; Finland remains at best position; Libya, Japan and Syria Tumble.

The Fund for Peace today released the eighth edition of its annual Failed States Index (FSI), highlighting global political, economic and social pressures experienced by states.

The 2012 FSI ranks Somalia as number one for the fifth consecutive year, citing widespread lawlessness, ineffective government, terrorism, insurgency, crime, and well-publicized pirate attacks against foreign vessels.

Meanwhile, Finland has remained in the best position, with its Scandinavian neighbors Sweden and Denmark rounding out the best three rankings. All three nations benefit from strong social and economic indicators, paired with excellent provision of public services and respect for human rights and the rule of law.

The FSI ranks 178 countries using 12 social, economic, and political indicators of pressure on the state, along with over 100 sub-indicators. These include such issues as Uneven Development, State Legitimacy, Group Grievance, and Human Rights. Each indicator is rated on a scale of 1-10, based on the analysis of millions of publicly available documents, other quantitative data, and assessments by analysts. A high score indicates high pressure on the state, and therefore a higher risk of instability.

Other notable changes this year include countries affected by the Arab Spring. Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Syria and Tunisia all ranked significantly worse than the previous year. Libya’s decline was the most remarkable, with the country registering the worst year-on-year worsening in the history of the FSI as a result of civil war, a NATO-led campaign of airstrikes and the toppling of the Qaddhafi regime. Similarly, Syria registered the fourth-greatest year-on-year worsening in the history of the FSI as the campaign of violence by the Assad government took hold.

In the wake of the massive earthquake and resultant nuclear crisis, Japan also worsened significantly. Though Japan continues to rank among the best seven percent of countries, Japan’s near-record worsening on the FSI demonstrates how susceptible even the most stable of nations are to sudden shocks.

Greece continued to decline as the economic crisis has gripped the country. A loss of confidence in the state, coinciding with the state’s lessened capacity to provide public services, have led to growing social pressures.

The Fund for Peace assessed South Sudan this year for the first time after the new nation gained its independence in the second half of 2011. Though the FSI does not formally rank South Sudan due to an incomplete year of data, the young nation nevertheless would have ranked approximately fourth, immediately behind its northern neighbor, Sudan. South Sudan’s fragile infrastructure, severe poverty, weak government, fraught relations with Sudan and heavy reliance on oil continue to be of concern.

Kyrgyzstan is the most improved nation, rebounding from a marked fall the previous year that was precipitated by the mid-2010 revolution that led to significant political reforms and ultimately a stable transition of power.

Krista Hendry, the Executive Director of The Fund for Peace, said the value of the FSI is in its application on the ground by governments, media, civil society and others to consider and work to improve the underlying conditions of conflict.

“We assess 178 countries because we recognize that all countries have pressures upon them that need to be managed. The difference between livelihoods within the countries is largely a product of the capacity of the state and society. This year we will develop a capacity index to test our assumption that states manage pressures better when they have open societies with strong state institutions based on the rule of law and democracy,” Ms. Hendry said.

 

THE RANKING LIST

1 Somalia 114.9

2 Congo (D. R.) 111.2

3 Sudan 109.4

n/r South Sudan* 108.4

4 Chad 107.6

5 Zimbabwe 106.3

6 Afghanistan 106.0

7 Haiti 104.9

8 Yemen 104.8

9 Iraq 104.3

10 Central African Republic 103.8

11 Cote d'Ivoire 103.6

12 Guinea 101.9

13 Pakistan 101.6

14 Nigeria 101.1

15 Guinea Bissau 99.2

16 Kenya 98.4

17 Ethiopia 97.9

18 Burundi 97.5

18 Niger 96.9

20 Uganda 96.5

21 Myanmar 96.2

22 North Korea 95.5

23 Eritrea 94.5

23 Syria 94.5

25 Liberia 93.3

26 Cameroon 93.1

27 Nepal 93.0

28 Timor-Leste 92.7

29 Bangladesh 92.2

29 Sri Lanka 92.2

31 Sierra Leone 90.4

31 Egypt 90.4

33 Congo (Republic) 90.1

34 Iran 89.6

35 Rwanda 89.3

36 Malawi 88.8

37 Cambodia 88.7

38 Mauritania 87.6

39 Togo 87.5

39 Uzbekistan 87.5

41 Burkina Faso 87.4

41 Kyrgyzstan 87.4

43 Equatorial Guinea 86.3

44 Zambia 85.9

45 Lebanon 85.8

46 Tajikistan 85.7

47 Solomon Islands 85.6

48 Laos 85.5

48 Angola 85.1

50 Libya 84.9

51 Georgia 84.8

52 Colombia 84.4

53 Dijbouti 83.8

54 Papua New Guinea 83.7

55 Swaziland 83.5

56 Philippines 83.2

57 Comoros 83.0

58 Madagascar 82.5

59 Mozambique 82.4

59 Bhutan 82.4

61 Israel/West Bank 82.2

62 Bolivia 82.1

63 Indonesia 80.6

63 Gambia 80.6

65 Fiji 80.5

66 Tanzania 80.4

67 Ecuador 80.1

68 Azerbaijan 79.8

69 Nicaragua 79.8

70 Guatemala 79.8

71 Senegal 79.8

72 Lesotho 79.8

73 Moldova 79.8

74 Benin 79.8

75 Honduras 79.8

76 China 79.8

77 Algeria 79.8

78 India 79.8

79 Mali 79.8

79 Bosnia and Herzegovina 79.8

81 Turkmenistan 79.8

82 Venezuela 79.8

83 Russia 79.8

84 Thailand 79.8

85 Turkey 79.8

85 Belarus 79.8

87 Morocco 79.8

88 Maldives 79.8

89 Serbia 79.8

90 Jordan 79.8

91 Cape Verde 79.8

92 Gabon 79.8

93 El Salvador 79.8

94 Tunisia 79.8

95 Dominican Republic 79.8

96 Vietnam 79.8

97 Sao Tome 79.8

98 Mexico 79.8

99 Peru 79.8

100 Saudi Arabia 79.8

101 Cuba 79.8

102 Armenia 79.8

103 Micronesia 79.8

104 Guyana 79.8

105 Suriname 79.8

106 Namibia 79.8

107 Paraguay 79.8

107 Kazakhstan 79.8

109 Macedonia 69.1

110 Samoa 68.5

110 Malaysia 68.5

112 Ghana 67.5

113 Ukraine 67.2

113 Belize 67.2

115 South Africa 66.8

115 Cyprus 66.8

117 Botswana 66.5

118 Albania 66.1

119 Jamaica 65.8

120 Seychelles 65.1

121 Grenada 65.0

122 Trinidad 64.4

123 Brazil 64.1

123 Brunei 64.1

125 Bahrain 62.2

126 Romania 59.5

127 Antigua & Barbuda 58.9

128 Kuwait 58.8

129 Mongolia 58.7

130 Bulgaria 56.3

130 Croatia 56.3

132 Panama 56.1

133 Montenegro 55.5

134 Bahamas 55.1

135 Barbados 52.0

136 Latvia 51.9

137 Oman 51.7

138 Greece 50.4

139 Costa Rica 49.7

140 United Arab Emirates 48.9

141 Hungary 48.3

142 Qatar 48.0

143 Estonia 47.5

144 Slovakia 47.4

145 Argentina 46.5

145 Italy 45.8

147 Mauritius 44.7

148 Poland 44.3

149 Lithuania 44.2

150 Malta 43.8

151 Chile 43.5

151 Japan 43.5

153 Spain 42.8

154 Uruguay 40.5

155 Czech Republic 39.5

156 South Korea 37.6

157 Singapore 35.6

158 United Kingdom 35.3

159 United States 34.8

160 Portugal 34.2

161 Slovenia 34.0

162 France 33.6

163 Belgium 33.5

164 Germany 31.7

165 Australia 29.2

166 Iceland 29.1

167 Netherlands 28.1

168 Austria 27.5

169 Canada 26.8

170 Ireland 26.5

171 New Zealand 25.6

172 Luxembourg 25.5

173 Norway 23.9

174 Switzerland 23.3

175 Denmark 23.0

176 Sweden 21.3

177 Finland 20.0

About FFP

The Fund for Peace (FFP) is an independent, nonpartisan, non-profit research and educational organization that works to prevent violent conflict and promote sustainable security. FFP promote sustainable security through research, training and education, engagement of civil society, building bridges across diverse sectors, and developing innovative technologies and tools for policy makers.

FFP is a leader in the conflict assessment and early warning field, the Fund for Peace focuses on the problems of weak and failing states. Our objective is to create practical tools and approaches for conflict mitigation that are useful to decision-makers.

 

 

 

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