Saturday, August 18, 2018
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Regina Pacies Secondary School Onitsha, Anambra State  representing  Nigeria  and Africa  in USA at the World Technology  innovation challenge  took the  first place  and won the top technological competition honour.


The girls team from Regina Pacies Secondary School Onitsha were represented  by below named students :
They were led by Uchenna Onwuamaegbu Ugwu and the Onitsha team upstaged  representatives of  USA, Spain, Turkey, Uzbekistan and China to clinch the gold medal.

1 Promise Nnalue
2 Jessica Osita
3 Nwabuaku Ossai
4 Adaeze Onuigbo
5 Vivian Okoye 


World tech innovation challenge competition was a global technological competition for seconday schools around the world at Silicon Valley, San Francisco USA. The girls team, Save-A-Soul, from Onitsha, Anambra State developed a mobile application called ‘FD Detector’ to tackle the problem of fake pharmaceutical products in the country.



Teams of girls worldwide learn the necessary skills to become tech entrepreneurs and leaders while creating apps addressing social issues in their communities. Junior division winners, Team  Save-A-Soul, hopes to help consumers identify and avoid the intake of fake drugs in Nigeria using its app, FD-Detector (Fake Drug Detector). According to Team Save-A-Soul, Nigeria has one of the largest markets for fake drugs. The girls plan to partner with the agency responsible for drug regulation in Nigeria, the National Agency for Food & Drug Administration and Control.

"Leveraging technology to save lives is our utmost priority, that is why we have decided to maximize this opportunity to solve the incessant rate of death caused by fake drugs," said Team Save-A-Soul.


Nigeria’s acting president Yemi Osinbajo applauded them.
“These young ladies in Junior Secondary School developed a mobile application called ‘FD Detector’ to tackle the problems of fake pharmaceutical products in Nigeria. Yesterday, they won the 2018 Technovation World Pitch in California. Congratulations! We are very proud of you,” Osinbajo tweeted.



The teenage girls from Anambra State will be pitching their app to investors in the Silicon Valley.
The team argue that Nigeria has the largest market for fake drugs, and they plan to partner with the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC), using the app, to tackle this challenge.



Credits: Mazi  Enuma, PRNewswire, Timileyin Omilana Guardian Nigeria.


Prof. Yemi Osinbajo ,  Nigeria’s acting president has sacked the  intelligence boss of the Department State Security (DSS), Lawal Musa Daura for the blockage of the country's National Assembly in Abuja, Nigeria.


Osinbajo  the country's vice president made the decision  to fire the  intelligence  chief  due to the  Tuesday morning blockade of the country’s legislature – the National Assembly, NASS.

Osinbajo acted on the capacity as the acting president as Nigerian President Buhari is on vacation in Britain.


The tweet by the Osinbajo’s personal assistant confirmed the discharge of  Lawal Musa Daura and the directive to the former boss of DSS to hand over to the most senior officer of the State Security Service till further notice.

Acting President @ProfOsinbajo has directed the termination, with immediate effect, of the appointment of the Director General of the Department of State Services (DSS), Mr. Lawal Musa Daura.


"The presidency in a statement said the obstruction of lawmakers was without its consent. The DSS is a security arm that is directly under the presidency. It is responsible for primary domestic intelligence and protection to top government officials.



Armed and masked personnel from the DSS temporarily block the entrance of NASS at a point blocking lawmakers from accessing the premises. After the lawmakers were allowed in, other officials and the media remained barred from the premises.



President Buhari handed over presidential duties to Osinbajo as he left Abuja to London for a 10-day vacation. "


Credit:  africanews

The examination body, West African Examination Council (WAEC) has released its 2018 May/June WASSCE results.   The rankings of all the 36 States,  including  the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Abuja in Nigeria has been released and published by WAEC.



Abia State came first , followed by Anambra State in seciond place and Edo State in the third position.


Below is the latest WAEC ranking of the 36 states and the FCT:

Abia – 1st


Anambra – 2nd


Edo – 3rd


Rivers – 4th


Imo – 5th


Lagos – 6th


Bayelsa – 7th


Delta – 8th


Enugu – 9th


Ebonyi – 10th


Ekiti – 11th
Kaduna – 12th
Ondo – 13th
Abuja – 14th
Kogi – 15th
Benue – 16th
Akwa Ibom – 17th
Kwara – 18th
Ogun – 19th
Cross River – 20th
Taraba – 21st
Plateau – 22nd
Nassarawa -23rd
Kano – 24th
Borno – 25th
Oyo – 26th
Niger – 27th
Adamawa -28th
Osun -29th
Sokoto – 30th
Bauchi – 31st
Kebbi – 32nd
Katsina – 33rd
Gombe – 34th
Jigawa 35th
Zamfara – 36th
Yobe – 37th

"African Citizens Must Stop Voting for Old Aged Men Above 70yrs Into Leadership" - Kofi Annan


Kofi Annan, the former United Nations secretary general has blamed poor state of goverance in Africa due old aged men in power.  The former UN Boss made the observation in Namibia  at the just concluded  world changers  summit .

His words:  “Africa has great values to depend upon, Africa could be independent, but we have too many old men at the presidency, some are above 70yrs, and what do you expect them to do?”.

This shocking view was made to inspire Africans to choose a more younger and better men and women into power rather than old men. Ghana is a typical example where the peace maker hails from. check the list below to see the number of African leaders Kofi Annan is talking about.


Annan further stressed that: ‘African politicians must learn to retire at a minimum age of 70yrs, but rather we have packed old men in our leadership, how could we move forward. Some are even above 80yrs and still ruling’


Kofi Annan was encouraging youthful goverance and leadership in Africa. But he is not the only one singing the forbidden song .  ​Renowned philanthropist, ​Mohammed “Mo” Ibrahim has also in the past challenged the young people to rise to the challenge of governing the continent and relinquish  old aged leadership.



Mo” Ibrahim  said, “You see people at 90 years and about to start new terms, you guys are crazy or what (he said referring to youths in attendance). “We see people in wheelchairs unable to raise hands standing for election. This is a joke; you are free to laugh…the whole world already laughing at us."

"The US, the most important country in the world, like it or not…Obama who is half African anyway was 46, 47 years. If ​Obama was in Kenya, ​what would he be doing, ​he would ​be driving bus​ maybe.​ “And he was not youngest president. (Bill) Clinton and (JF) Kennedy were even younger. ​Why these big countries lead… men in their 40s entrust their nuclear weapon, economies, all resources. And we only pick up men at 90s to lead us; to lead us where? To the grave?"


Credits: howafrica, daily post

 

I know what you’re thinking.


So before I tell you my story, let’s just get that bit out of the way first. It’s been more than a decade and I still get asked

this one thing about my time in England.


“Hey, what happened to you signing for Manchester United? How come you swapped for Chelsea at the last minute? ”


Every time.
Well, my Dad wasn’t too pleased about what happened either. He wanted me to go to Manchester United because he

loved Alex Ferguson. Back home in Nigeria, a lot of people were saying I should go to United because of how well they

work with young players, whereas Chelsea just bought superstars.



And it’s true, I was only 18 years old and Chelsea had players like Lampard, Ballack and Makélélé in midfield. A lot of

people in Nigeria doubted that I could even make the Chelsea team if I went there.



So … why did I turn down the biggest club in the world?


I’ll tell you what happened. I had all these people on both sides fighting over me. Agents, managers, strangers,

guys handing me papers. I had Sir Alex Ferguson calling me on the phone on one side. And I had Roman

Abramovich on the other side, putting me up in London, hiding me somewhere where only a few people knew

where I was. It was really confusing, and I was a kid, you know?




After a while, someone from FIFA gave me a phone call. They said, “Listen, we know you’re young and you

have these two clubs fighting over you. We can’t decide for you. You can only go where you want. You have to tell us.”

I thought about it for a long time. It was the biggest decision of my life.

You know what made my mind up? Chelsea had signed three other players from Nigeria along with me. They

were staying with me at the house in London to keep me company. These guys …  their lives depended on the

decision I was making. If I went to United, they were gone. If I went to Chelsea, they were going to have a

career. No matter how long it lasted, that was important to me. Just to give them a chance, you know?

I chose Chelsea, and four lives changed that day.

No one thought that I’d end up lasting there for 11 years. No one thought I would play in so many games or win as many

trophies as I did. That’s one thing a lot of people in Nigeria respect me for — I don’t chicken out. You can say whatever you want

about me, but all these managers came and went at Chelsea and they looked at all the superstars ahead of me, and I didn’t

chicken out. I survived. That mentality goes all the way back to my childhood in Jos, Nigeria.

When I was a kid, I didn’t have shoes, let alone football boots. But I would always be out in the street every morning, playing

barefoot with hardly any clothes on. That’s how badly I wanted to be Kanu.


When I was a kid, Kanu was the man. Nwankwo Kanu and Jay-Jay Okocha, they were the footballing kings of Nigeria. I wanted to be them. There’s this image I have in my mind of me and my friends running around trying to find a TV so we could watch Kanu play for Arsenal. Back then, sometimes the electricity would go off for like a week, and you’d have to go around town searching for a coffee shop or a beer parlour or some place that had a generator. Every Saturday at 3 p.m., they always showed the Premier League, and Nigerians love Arsenal, so it was usually Arsenal on TV.



We’d watch Kanu do his thing on the pitch and then we’d go out into the streets after the game and try to imitate whatever move or trick he did.

But the dream is the dream. What I mean by that is … Well, being Kanu takes so much more than daydreaming. It takes work and sacrifice. And sometimes it takes people who are willing to help you. I remember when I was little, there were tournaments where you had to play in boots. That was the rule. But I didn’t have boots. My family had money to send me to school, but not enough for the football stuff. So this guy in our town, Mabao, he had a little bit of money, and he used to buy me and some other kids boots and clothes so we could play in the tournaments.

Without him, and without my parents, I wouldn’t be where I am.

Somehow something clicked for me when I was 12, when I was playing for the Pepsi Football Academy. We were playing against a side called Plateau United. You see, in Jos, Plateau United was the team.


They were the government team — the big boys with money. If you wanted to be the next Kanu, you had to play for Plateau United. So you know what I do in the under-13 state tournament against Jos? I work my butt off and end up changing someone’s mind. After the match, Plateau came to my house and told my mother that they wanted sign me. And my mum was like, “What? He’s still in school! You know how old he is? Why do you want to sign him? He’s going to play with grandpas?!”

My mum always called the bigger, richer kids grandpas.

 

 

 

 

Image result for chimamanda ngozi adichie

 

Nigerian writer, poet and novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has won the 2018 PEN Pinter prize. Adichie is a worldwide sensational author with a house hold name as a result of her books and TED talks.  The prize award was named in the recognition and memory of playwright Harold Pinter.

She was hailed by Harold Pinter’s widow, the biographer Antonia Fraser, as a writer who embodies “those qualities of courage and outspokenness which Harold much admired”.


“I admired Harold Pinter’s talent, his courage, his lucid dedication to telling his truth, and I am honoured to be given an award in his name,” said Adichie.




Judges for the award praised Adichie’s “refusal to be deterred or detained by the categories of others”.


“In this age of the privatised, marketised self, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the exception who defies the rule,” said Maureen Freely, chair of trustees for English PEN. “Sophisticated beyond measure in her understanding of gender, race, and global inequality, she guides us through the revolving doors of identity politics, liberating us all.”



An award-winning novelist – her 2004 debut Purple Hibiscus won the Commonwealth writers’ prize, Half of a Yellow Sun won her the Orange prize in 2006, and Americanah took the US National Book Critics Circle award in 2014 – Adichie is also known for her TED talks and essays. Her most recent book is Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, which began as advice for a friend about how to raise her daughter as a feminist.Her 2013 TED talk, We Should All Be Feminists, was later published as a pamphlet and distributed to every 16-year-old in Sweden as part of a campaign by the Swedish Women’s Lobby. Audio from the talk was also sampled by Beyoncé in her song ***Flawless.

Adichie will be awarded the prize on 9 October

Credit: Guardian london

 

Christ Embassy’s Man of God, Pastor Chris Oyakhilome, has concluded the 2018 Holy Land Tour. The church planned out the trip meticulously for the benefit of believers of Jesus across the world.Hundreds of the Pastor’s followers joined him on this spiritual visit to Israel and Jordan. Each day on the itinerary was filled with sites seeing of holy places, considered important to both Christians and Jews. The tour followed the journey Christ took in the Bible and scripture, allowing participants to walk in His footsteps and learn from His glory.



LoveWorld incorporations were overwhelmed by the warm welcoming they got from the Jewish Land. Jews and Christians alike were delighted for the visit of Pastor Chris, highlighting the close connection Evangelicals have to the Holy Land and its people.The visit coincided with two monumental events for the state of Israel. The first is the marking of the 70th year of Independence for the Jewish Land. The second event was the move of the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, the capital of Israel.




Earlier this year the President of the United States of America, Donald Trump, announced his intentions of moving the Embassy. The move aimed to signal to the international community that the US stands behind and recognizes the Holy City, Jerusalem, as the capital of the Jewish Land, Israel. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs organized a celebratory reception in honor of the move. Pastor Chris Oyakhilome was personally invited to the event. The Pastor received warm welcome and was embraced by members of government as well as a variety of Jewish individuals. The hosts were eager to welcome the world-renowned Evangelist Pastor Chris Oyakhilome.



Pastor Chris Oyakhilome and his entourage managed to visit numerous sites during the eight-day visit Some included Caesarea, the Sea of Galilee, Abu Gosh, Mount Hertzel, and the Tomb of Lazareth. Additionally, one group was provided with the opportunity to visit holy sites in Jordan, witnessing the diversity of the Holy Land. Participants and local observers were also able to see Pastor Chris Oyakhilome minister many times throughout the trip. They testified that ministrations were “filled with gospel and glory, bringing all those involved closer to the Lord.”


 

 

FULL SQUAD

Goalkeepers: Ikechukwu Ezenwa (Enyimba), Daniel Akpeyi (Chippa United/RSA), Francis Uzoho (Deportivo La Coruna/ESP)


Defenders: William Troost-Ekong, Shehu Abdullahi (Bursaspor/TUR), Leon Balogun (Brighton Hove Albion/ENG), Kenneth Omeruo (Chelsea/ENG), Bryan Idowu (Amkar Perm/RUS), Chidozie Awaziem (FC Porto/POR), Elderson Echiejile (Cercle Brugge/BEL), Tyronne Ebuehi (Benfica/POR)


Midfielders: Mikel Obi (Tianjin Teda/CHN), Ogenyi Onazi (Trabzonspor/TUR), John Ogu (Hapoel Be’er Sheva/ISR), Wilfred Ndidi (Leicester City/ENG),Oghenekaro Etebo (CD Feirense/POR), Joel Obi (Torino FC/ITA)

Forwards: Odion Ighalo (Changchun Yatai/CHN), Ahmed Musa, Kelechi Iheanacho(Leicester City/ENG), Alex Iwobi (Arsenal/ENG), Simeon Nwankwo (FC Crotone/ITA), Victor Moses (Chelsea/ENG)

 

 

 

 

Nigeria coach names final World Cup squad, says team has 'a lot of work to do'

 

 

University of Houston


United States based Nigerian economic strategist Emeka Chiakwelu and the founder of public policy center AFRIPOL has blamed Nigeria dire dependence on oil as a consequence of colonialism.


“Among the negative ramifications of colonialism is the inability to impact a legacy of wealth creation to Nigerians and her entity,” Chiakwelu the economic expert said.


Chiakwelu further emphasized, “Nigerian leaders tie and congregate the price of oil with the rate of development in the country. Instead of finding ways to create wealth, they are rather focusing their energy on the depleting oil resource that its impact on the populace is quite minimal. The thriving 21st century economies of United States, Japan and China are product of human capital and innovations. The wealth of nation in 21st century is not inside the ground but in the brain.”



The principal strategist at Africa Political and Economic Strategic Center (AFRIPOL) has gone into partnership with University of Houston in Texas to find solutions to alleviate the problems of poor wealth management and lethargic capital intensification in order to empower our leaders to speak the language of wealth creation and not squash in blame game.

“Nigerian leaders discussion on economy is devoid of economic understanding because they are not equipped with tools to rationally discuss on economy and wealth of a nation,” Chiakwelu registered as he spoke on the issue.

“Nigerian schools and institutions must be impacted with 21st century thinking on economy and wealth of a nation when it comes on how to pragmatically dislodged from oil dependence and rely on human capital and human resources to boost her economic standing.”

“Nigerian leaders are not trained to see the significance of her abundance human capital which can be drastically consummated to create massive wealth and lunch the nation as a center of innovation and research. But instead our leaders are worried about the fluctuation price of oil, unaware that the economy of oil is fast becoming antiquated without future promise,” as Chiakwelu re-emphasized.

Therefore series of lectures on trade, e-commerce, telecommunications, leadership and politics in Africa has been initiated by AFRIPOL and University of Houston.


The Strategic Policy Lecture Series is a joint initiative by the African Political & Economic Center (AFRIPOL) and the African American Studies program at the University of Houston to provide University of Houston students and Houston-area communities with high quality humanities programming, discussions and symposia around contemporary issues of trade, e-commerce, telecommunications, leadership and politics in Africa.  Through this initiative, AFRIPOL and African American Studies will provide the following benefits to UH students, faculty, and community participants:

· An introduction to the historic and regional nuances that impact trade, commerce and politics in Africa.
· A platform to facilitate inter-economic dialogue between African and African American communities.
· Exposure to first-hand narratives of the social, political and economic challenges and opportunities that face African countries through discussions with leading business persons and elected officials.
· A contemporary understanding and review of the role that trade and commerce play in promoting interdependence among African and African American communities.


AFRIPOL is foremost a public policy center whose fundamental objective is to broaden the parameters of public policy debates in Africa, and to advocate, promote and encourage free enterprise, democracy, sustainable green environments, human rights, conflict resolutions, transparency and probity in Africa.

Credits-  University of Houston, BBC

University of Houston

 


Nigerian prolific and world acclaimed author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will address Harvard University class of 2018, as part of the annual class day celebration on May 23, the day before Harvard’s 367th Commencement.


“Ms. Adichie is a prolific writer whose work has been translated into more than 30 languages. She wrote the novels Purple Hibiscus, which won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; Half of a Yellow Sun, which won the Orange Prize; and Americanah, a 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award winner, which she finalized during a fellowship year at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.”


Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria.
Her work has been translated into over thirty languages and has appeared in various publications, including The New Yorker, Granta, The O. Henry Prize Stories, the Financial Times, and Zoetrope. She is the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus, which won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; Half of a Yellow Sun, which won the Orange Prize and was a National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist and a New York Times Notable Book; and Americanah, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was named one of The New York Times Top Ten Best Books of 2013. Ms. Adichie is also the author of the story collection The Thing Around Your Neck.


Ms. Adichie has been invited to speak around the world. Her 2009 TED Talk, The Danger of A Single Story, is now one of the most-viewed TED Talks of all time. Her 2012 talk We Should All Be Feminists has a started a worldwide conversation about feminism, and was published as a book in 2014.

Her most recent book, Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, was published in March 2017. A recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Ms. Adichie divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

credits - olanrewaju eweniyi Konbini, Adichie website

 

 

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