Tuesday, September 29, 2020
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I know what you’re thinking.


So before I tell you my story, let’s just get that bit out of the way first. It’s been more than a decade and I still get asked

this one thing about my time in England.


“Hey, what happened to you signing for Manchester United? How come you swapped for Chelsea at the last minute? ”


Every time.
Well, my Dad wasn’t too pleased about what happened either. He wanted me to go to Manchester United because he

loved Alex Ferguson. Back home in Nigeria, a lot of people were saying I should go to United because of how well they

work with young players, whereas Chelsea just bought superstars.



And it’s true, I was only 18 years old and Chelsea had players like Lampard, Ballack and Makélélé in midfield. A lot of

people in Nigeria doubted that I could even make the Chelsea team if I went there.



So … why did I turn down the biggest club in the world?


I’ll tell you what happened. I had all these people on both sides fighting over me. Agents, managers, strangers,

guys handing me papers. I had Sir Alex Ferguson calling me on the phone on one side. And I had Roman

Abramovich on the other side, putting me up in London, hiding me somewhere where only a few people knew

where I was. It was really confusing, and I was a kid, you know?




After a while, someone from FIFA gave me a phone call. They said, “Listen, we know you’re young and you

have these two clubs fighting over you. We can’t decide for you. You can only go where you want. You have to tell us.”

I thought about it for a long time. It was the biggest decision of my life.

You know what made my mind up? Chelsea had signed three other players from Nigeria along with me. They

were staying with me at the house in London to keep me company. These guys …  their lives depended on the

decision I was making. If I went to United, they were gone. If I went to Chelsea, they were going to have a

career. No matter how long it lasted, that was important to me. Just to give them a chance, you know?

I chose Chelsea, and four lives changed that day.

No one thought that I’d end up lasting there for 11 years. No one thought I would play in so many games or win as many

trophies as I did. That’s one thing a lot of people in Nigeria respect me for — I don’t chicken out. You can say whatever you want

about me, but all these managers came and went at Chelsea and they looked at all the superstars ahead of me, and I didn’t

chicken out. I survived. That mentality goes all the way back to my childhood in Jos, Nigeria.

When I was a kid, I didn’t have shoes, let alone football boots. But I would always be out in the street every morning, playing

barefoot with hardly any clothes on. That’s how badly I wanted to be Kanu.


When I was a kid, Kanu was the man. Nwankwo Kanu and Jay-Jay Okocha, they were the footballing kings of Nigeria. I wanted to be them. There’s this image I have in my mind of me and my friends running around trying to find a TV so we could watch Kanu play for Arsenal. Back then, sometimes the electricity would go off for like a week, and you’d have to go around town searching for a coffee shop or a beer parlour or some place that had a generator. Every Saturday at 3 p.m., they always showed the Premier League, and Nigerians love Arsenal, so it was usually Arsenal on TV.



We’d watch Kanu do his thing on the pitch and then we’d go out into the streets after the game and try to imitate whatever move or trick he did.

But the dream is the dream. What I mean by that is … Well, being Kanu takes so much more than daydreaming. It takes work and sacrifice. And sometimes it takes people who are willing to help you. I remember when I was little, there were tournaments where you had to play in boots. That was the rule. But I didn’t have boots. My family had money to send me to school, but not enough for the football stuff. So this guy in our town, Mabao, he had a little bit of money, and he used to buy me and some other kids boots and clothes so we could play in the tournaments.

Without him, and without my parents, I wouldn’t be where I am.

Somehow something clicked for me when I was 12, when I was playing for the Pepsi Football Academy. We were playing against a side called Plateau United. You see, in Jos, Plateau United was the team.


They were the government team — the big boys with money. If you wanted to be the next Kanu, you had to play for Plateau United. So you know what I do in the under-13 state tournament against Jos? I work my butt off and end up changing someone’s mind. After the match, Plateau came to my house and told my mother that they wanted sign me. And my mum was like, “What? He’s still in school! You know how old he is? Why do you want to sign him? He’s going to play with grandpas?!”

My mum always called the bigger, richer kids grandpas.

 

 

 

 

Image result for chimamanda ngozi adichie

 

Nigerian writer, poet and novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has won the 2018 PEN Pinter prize. Adichie is a worldwide sensational author with a house hold name as a result of her books and TED talks.  The prize award was named in the recognition and memory of playwright Harold Pinter.

She was hailed by Harold Pinter’s widow, the biographer Antonia Fraser, as a writer who embodies “those qualities of courage and outspokenness which Harold much admired”.


“I admired Harold Pinter’s talent, his courage, his lucid dedication to telling his truth, and I am honoured to be given an award in his name,” said Adichie.




Judges for the award praised Adichie’s “refusal to be deterred or detained by the categories of others”.


“In this age of the privatised, marketised self, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the exception who defies the rule,” said Maureen Freely, chair of trustees for English PEN. “Sophisticated beyond measure in her understanding of gender, race, and global inequality, she guides us through the revolving doors of identity politics, liberating us all.”



An award-winning novelist – her 2004 debut Purple Hibiscus won the Commonwealth writers’ prize, Half of a Yellow Sun won her the Orange prize in 2006, and Americanah took the US National Book Critics Circle award in 2014 – Adichie is also known for her TED talks and essays. Her most recent book is Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, which began as advice for a friend about how to raise her daughter as a feminist.Her 2013 TED talk, We Should All Be Feminists, was later published as a pamphlet and distributed to every 16-year-old in Sweden as part of a campaign by the Swedish Women’s Lobby. Audio from the talk was also sampled by Beyoncé in her song ***Flawless.

Adichie will be awarded the prize on 9 October

Credit: Guardian london

 

Christ Embassy’s Man of God, Pastor Chris Oyakhilome, has concluded the 2018 Holy Land Tour. The church planned out the trip meticulously for the benefit of believers of Jesus across the world.Hundreds of the Pastor’s followers joined him on this spiritual visit to Israel and Jordan. Each day on the itinerary was filled with sites seeing of holy places, considered important to both Christians and Jews. The tour followed the journey Christ took in the Bible and scripture, allowing participants to walk in His footsteps and learn from His glory.



LoveWorld incorporations were overwhelmed by the warm welcoming they got from the Jewish Land. Jews and Christians alike were delighted for the visit of Pastor Chris, highlighting the close connection Evangelicals have to the Holy Land and its people.The visit coincided with two monumental events for the state of Israel. The first is the marking of the 70th year of Independence for the Jewish Land. The second event was the move of the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, the capital of Israel.




Earlier this year the President of the United States of America, Donald Trump, announced his intentions of moving the Embassy. The move aimed to signal to the international community that the US stands behind and recognizes the Holy City, Jerusalem, as the capital of the Jewish Land, Israel. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs organized a celebratory reception in honor of the move. Pastor Chris Oyakhilome was personally invited to the event. The Pastor received warm welcome and was embraced by members of government as well as a variety of Jewish individuals. The hosts were eager to welcome the world-renowned Evangelist Pastor Chris Oyakhilome.



Pastor Chris Oyakhilome and his entourage managed to visit numerous sites during the eight-day visit Some included Caesarea, the Sea of Galilee, Abu Gosh, Mount Hertzel, and the Tomb of Lazareth. Additionally, one group was provided with the opportunity to visit holy sites in Jordan, witnessing the diversity of the Holy Land. Participants and local observers were also able to see Pastor Chris Oyakhilome minister many times throughout the trip. They testified that ministrations were “filled with gospel and glory, bringing all those involved closer to the Lord.”


 

 

FULL SQUAD

Goalkeepers: Ikechukwu Ezenwa (Enyimba), Daniel Akpeyi (Chippa United/RSA), Francis Uzoho (Deportivo La Coruna/ESP)


Defenders: William Troost-Ekong, Shehu Abdullahi (Bursaspor/TUR), Leon Balogun (Brighton Hove Albion/ENG), Kenneth Omeruo (Chelsea/ENG), Bryan Idowu (Amkar Perm/RUS), Chidozie Awaziem (FC Porto/POR), Elderson Echiejile (Cercle Brugge/BEL), Tyronne Ebuehi (Benfica/POR)


Midfielders: Mikel Obi (Tianjin Teda/CHN), Ogenyi Onazi (Trabzonspor/TUR), John Ogu (Hapoel Be’er Sheva/ISR), Wilfred Ndidi (Leicester City/ENG),Oghenekaro Etebo (CD Feirense/POR), Joel Obi (Torino FC/ITA)

Forwards: Odion Ighalo (Changchun Yatai/CHN), Ahmed Musa, Kelechi Iheanacho(Leicester City/ENG), Alex Iwobi (Arsenal/ENG), Simeon Nwankwo (FC Crotone/ITA), Victor Moses (Chelsea/ENG)

 

 

 

 

Nigeria coach names final World Cup squad, says team has 'a lot of work to do'

 

 

University of Houston


United States based Nigerian economic strategist Emeka Chiakwelu and the founder of public policy center AFRIPOL has blamed Nigeria dire dependence on oil as a consequence of colonialism.


“Among the negative ramifications of colonialism is the inability to impact a legacy of wealth creation to Nigerians and her entity,” Chiakwelu the economic expert said.


Chiakwelu further emphasized, “Nigerian leaders tie and congregate the price of oil with the rate of development in the country. Instead of finding ways to create wealth, they are rather focusing their energy on the depleting oil resource that its impact on the populace is quite minimal. The thriving 21st century economies of United States, Japan and China are product of human capital and innovations. The wealth of nation in 21st century is not inside the ground but in the brain.”



The principal strategist at Africa Political and Economic Strategic Center (AFRIPOL) has gone into partnership with University of Houston in Texas to find solutions to alleviate the problems of poor wealth management and lethargic capital intensification in order to empower our leaders to speak the language of wealth creation and not squash in blame game.

“Nigerian leaders discussion on economy is devoid of economic understanding because they are not equipped with tools to rationally discuss on economy and wealth of a nation,” Chiakwelu registered as he spoke on the issue.

“Nigerian schools and institutions must be impacted with 21st century thinking on economy and wealth of a nation when it comes on how to pragmatically dislodged from oil dependence and rely on human capital and human resources to boost her economic standing.”

“Nigerian leaders are not trained to see the significance of her abundance human capital which can be drastically consummated to create massive wealth and lunch the nation as a center of innovation and research. But instead our leaders are worried about the fluctuation price of oil, unaware that the economy of oil is fast becoming antiquated without future promise,” as Chiakwelu re-emphasized.

Therefore series of lectures on trade, e-commerce, telecommunications, leadership and politics in Africa has been initiated by AFRIPOL and University of Houston.


The Strategic Policy Lecture Series is a joint initiative by the African Political & Economic Center (AFRIPOL) and the African American Studies program at the University of Houston to provide University of Houston students and Houston-area communities with high quality humanities programming, discussions and symposia around contemporary issues of trade, e-commerce, telecommunications, leadership and politics in Africa.  Through this initiative, AFRIPOL and African American Studies will provide the following benefits to UH students, faculty, and community participants:

· An introduction to the historic and regional nuances that impact trade, commerce and politics in Africa.
· A platform to facilitate inter-economic dialogue between African and African American communities.
· Exposure to first-hand narratives of the social, political and economic challenges and opportunities that face African countries through discussions with leading business persons and elected officials.
· A contemporary understanding and review of the role that trade and commerce play in promoting interdependence among African and African American communities.


AFRIPOL is foremost a public policy center whose fundamental objective is to broaden the parameters of public policy debates in Africa, and to advocate, promote and encourage free enterprise, democracy, sustainable green environments, human rights, conflict resolutions, transparency and probity in Africa.

Credits-  University of Houston, BBC

University of Houston

 


Nigerian prolific and world acclaimed author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will address Harvard University class of 2018, as part of the annual class day celebration on May 23, the day before Harvard’s 367th Commencement.


“Ms. Adichie is a prolific writer whose work has been translated into more than 30 languages. She wrote the novels Purple Hibiscus, which won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; Half of a Yellow Sun, which won the Orange Prize; and Americanah, a 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award winner, which she finalized during a fellowship year at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.”


Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria.
Her work has been translated into over thirty languages and has appeared in various publications, including The New Yorker, Granta, The O. Henry Prize Stories, the Financial Times, and Zoetrope. She is the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus, which won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; Half of a Yellow Sun, which won the Orange Prize and was a National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist and a New York Times Notable Book; and Americanah, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was named one of The New York Times Top Ten Best Books of 2013. Ms. Adichie is also the author of the story collection The Thing Around Your Neck.


Ms. Adichie has been invited to speak around the world. Her 2009 TED Talk, The Danger of A Single Story, is now one of the most-viewed TED Talks of all time. Her 2012 talk We Should All Be Feminists has a started a worldwide conversation about feminism, and was published as a book in 2014.

Her most recent book, Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, was published in March 2017. A recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Ms. Adichie divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

credits - olanrewaju eweniyi Konbini, Adichie website

 

 

Nigerian Americans NFL draft 2018

Uchenna Nwosu

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The Los Angles Chargers selected linebacker Uchenna Nwosu with the 48th pick in the 2018 draft. He went to school at University of Southern California. Initially Nwosu had difficulty deciding whether he wanted to play football. He played some middle school ball, but quit and did not play until his sophomore year in high school. He was a Los Angeles all-city pick as a senior, earning a scholarship from one of his hometown schools. Nwosu was named a co-MVP of USC along with quarterback Sam Darnold.[3] He was also on the watchlist for the Butkus Award. Following his senior season, he participated in the 2018 Senior Bowl.




Derrick Nnadi

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Defensive tackle Derrick Nnadi was selected by the Kansas City Chiefs in the third round of the 2018 NFL draft. He attended Florida State University. Listed at 6-foot-1, 312 pounds, Nnadi is not the largest nose tackle in front of scouts during the 2017 season. Few will outwork him, however, as he was named a third-team All-ACC selection, compiling 56 tackles, 10 for loss, and 3.5 sacks in 13 starts. ACC coaches named him first-team all-conference in 2016 after earning the team's Defensive Most Improved Player award in the spring. Nnadi started 11 of 13 games played, fighting through an early-season ankle injury to be credited with 49 tackles from the middle, 10.5 for loss, and six sacks. He collected third-team all-conference accolades from league media as a sophomore, starting every game (45 tackles, two sacks), following a true freshman campaign that saw him on the field for nine games (18 tackles, six against Georgia Tech's triple-option rushing attack in the ACC Championship Game). Despite his lack of height, Nnadi was considered a top 10 defensive tackle prospect nationally after amassing 33 sacks in his final two years of high school ball.



Chukwuma Okorafor

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Pittsburgh Steelers draft Western Michigan tackle Chukwuma Okorafor in third round. Chukwuma Okorafor is well traveled, living in Nigeria, South Africa, Botswana and Southfield before spending the last four years in Kalamazoo. Okorafor received numerous All-American accolades and a first-team all-conference nod for his play as a senior in 12 starts at the left tackle spot.



Joel Iyiegbuniwe (Agu-Igbo)

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Bears drafted Joel Iyiegbuniwe. Iyiegbuniwe will graduate from the pre-med program at Western Kentucky in May, and he has an eye on one day attending medical school to become a pediatrician. But first he medical education has to wait for NFL career.




Ogbonnia Okoronkwo – Drafted by Rams .

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Former Oklahoma linebacker Ogbonnia Okoronkwo was selected by the Los Angeles Rams with the 160th overall pick during the NFL draft’s fifth round. Ogbonnia "Obo" Okoronkwo was the son of Nigerian immigrants, and a defensive end recruit from Houston Alief Taylor High School before going to Oklahoma. He was also named second-team All-American with Jefferson by the Associated Press for his efforts.




Duke Ejiofor

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Texans selected Wake Forest DE Duke Ejiofor in 6th Round as a defensive end, he will help Texans to facilitate their defensive front. Ejiofor's parents emigrated from Nigeria years ago, and you can tell by Duke and his siblings' names (Prince, Kingsley) that they come from royalty in that country.



Ade Aruna

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Aruna selected by Vikings as Defensive end in the 7th round 2018 draft. The 24-year-old was born in Nigeria and moved to the United States by himself when he was 16. “It was really tough, especially for me,” Aruna said of leaving his family behind in Nigeria. “I’ve been wanting to do something since I was born. My father put a lot of responsibility on me as the fourth child of the house. I wanted to do something that I was going to be proud of for the rest of my life. “So, it was my decision. My parents didn’t have anything to do with it. They just blessed me and wished me good luck on everything,” Aruna added. “I came over just to do something for my family and bring joy to my country and my family.”

Aruna came to the United State from Nigeria to attend high school and play basketball. A coach at La Lumiere High School in Indiana saw Aruna's build and convinced him to play football in his senior season. He received a three-star rating despite only playing one season of football, and Tulane signed him to a scholarship offer. Aruna redshirted in 2013 and played in eight games the following year, making seven tackles with one sack. He gained enough experience in those seasons to start 11 of 12 games as a sophomore, totaling 32 stops, five for loss, three sacks, and two pass breakups. Aruna had his best year in 2016, starting all 12 games, posting 43 tackles, 10 for loss and five sacks. He could only manage 25 tackles and three sacks in 11 starts (12 games played) in 2017.

 

 

Nigeria is a federal republic composed of 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT). In 2015 citizens elected President Muhammadu Buhari of the All Progressives Congress party to a four-year term in the first successful democratic transfer of power from a sitting president in the country’s history. Civilian authorities did not always maintain effective control over the security services.

The insurgency in the Northeast by the militant terrorist groups Boko Haram and the Islamic State in West Africa (ISIS-WA) continued. The groups conducted numerous attacks on government and civilian targets that resulted in thousands of deaths and injuries, widespread destruction, the internal displacement of approximately 1.8 million persons, and external displacement of an estimated 205,000 Nigerian refugees to neighboring countries, principally Cameroon, Chad, and Niger.

The most significant human rights issues included extrajudicial and arbitrary killings; disappearances and arbitrary detentions; torture, particularly in detention facilities, including sexual exploitation and abuse; use of children by some security elements, looting, and destruction of property; civilian detentions in military facilities, often based on flimsy evidence; denial of fair public trial; executive influence on the judiciary; infringement on citizens’ privacy rights; restrictions on freedoms of speech, press, assembly, and movement; official corruption; lack of accountability in cases involving violence against women and children, including female genital mutilation/cutting and sexual exploitation of children; trafficking in persons; early and forced marriages; criminalization of status and same-sex sexual conduct based on sexual orientation and gender identity; and forced and bonded labor.

 

COMPLETE  REPORT  NIGERIA 2016 HUMAN RIGHTS REPORT

“We have seen the light, and we are not going back to darkness!” –  Hon  Sam Okey Mbonu

 


In a star-studded Event, featuring Hollywood Stars, business executives, and professionals, including notable Los Angeleno’s of Nigerian descent, in California, Hon. Sam Okey Mbonu, was honored as one of the most accomplished Nigerians in the United States,  at a special event in his honor, at the “Airforce One Boardroom at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, California”.



Mbonu is the “first” African leader to be honored at a reception at the famous “Airforce One Boardroom at the Ronal Reagan Presidential Library”.  Mbonu’s recognition was preceded by a reception for the Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau, on the same day and in the same venue, thus underscoring a shift in global leadership to a newer generation.



Mbonu in his remarks decried the depth at which Nigeria had descended, due to a leadership vacuum at the center.  Mbonu stated that in a globalized world, any failures in leadership in a large country like Nigeria, would be apparently glaring at the world stage.  Mbonu invoked the spirit of Ronald Reagan, America’s greatest president of the 20 Century who’s immortal words were that, "The future does not belong to the fainthearted, it belongs to the Brave".



Mbonu stated that the brave in any given society were those who have the courage to confront systems that held people down, and to restore the dignity of humanity when societies fall short.  Mbonu also called for the new generation of Nigerians to hearken unto the words of former US President Barack Obama who said, that the new generations were “the ones we’ve been waiting for”!

Mbonu recounted his rise from a humble childhood, having been reared by parents who were educators in Nigeria, and his life of public service from a young age, to his accomplishments in the United States, as a Washington DC Policy Advisor, Consultant, and Media Analyst, who provides strategic advisory to US institutions, including the US Conress, Organization of American States, various US institutions, and the media; on Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa matters.


Image result for sam okey mbonuMbonu arrival at Ronald Reagan Presidential Library California


Mbonu is also co-founder of the Washington-based Nigeria and Africa focused Think-Tank, the “Nigerian-American Leadership Council (NAL Council)”; he had also previously served as a “Commissioner for Housing & Community Development in Maryland, United States”.  Mbonu was in 2015 designated a “powerful voice on US-Nigeria matters” by the US media giant MSNBC.  In his remarks, Mbonu regretted that in recent times, the world had watched as Nigeria slowly and hopelessly descended into, strife, chaos, and gory images of murderous religious-fanaticism, on international television.


Mbonu said that based on the situation in Nigeria, he had formed a “presidential exploratory committee”, to offer solutions to Nigeria’s current problems of chronic under-development and strife.  Mbonu stated that his public service in Nigeria would focus on two man areas, “Electric Energy and the provision of sufficient Water Resources across the country.”  Mbonu stated that he would center his public service in Nigeria on what he called “the Power & Water Agenda”; he believes that once electric power is created, the Nigerian economy would quadruple and strife would be reduced to insignificance.

Mbonu

In his conclusion, Mbonu stated: “Some of us have been tried and tested in the most rigorous environment in the world, the United States.  We have integrity, we are clean, we are fresh, and we do not have corruption charges on our neck, anywhere in the world”.



Mbonu further admonished Nigerians, especially the youth, that: “We must all strive to make a difference, and in the immortal words of America’s greatest civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr, “If you can't fly then run, if you can't run then walk, if you can't walk then crawl, but whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward,” because, the river only flows in one direction: “FORWARD”!



Mbonu added,  “We are the one’s Nigeria has been waiting for, we are the 21st Century, we are the digital age, we are the incorruptible, we are global citizens, we have seen the world, we have seen the light, and we are not going back to darkness!”

 


Every once in a while, a movie arrives right on time.


Earlier this year President Trump insulted people of African heritage when he referred to Haiti and African nations as “shithole countries.” His words were an affront to countless Americans and people across the world; they flew in the face of American values of respect for diversity and opening doors of opportunity to all.


But while the White House is putting down people of African descent, Hollywood is lifting us up — most spectacularly through the release of Disney-Marvel’s new movie, “Black Panther.”


“Black Panther” is a long-awaited film. It brings to life a technologically advanced, culturally rich mecca of Black excellence. It takes place in Wakanda — a fictional, fully autonomous African nation, rich in resources and innovation.



The nation is home to a brilliant ecosystem of black technologists. It is a sight to behold. A cinematic vision of black genius, accomplishment and prosperity that is rarely portrayed. And one I am so excited to witness.



I had the privilege of watching the film while seated in front of Denzel Washington, beside Whoopi Goldberg and in the company of almost every major black actor and celebrity on the east coast: Chris Rock, Gayle King, Tyra Banks, Robin Roberts and more. Denzel was moved to tears by the movie, said he felt like a proud father, and predicted it would make a billion dollars.



This film is a godsend that will lift the self-esteem of black children in the US and around the world for a long time. It shifts the understanding of where the power of African-descended people can come from. It underscores the fact that such power, in the new century, will come from access to technology more than any other source, and will inspire young people of color to pursue technology as a possible career path.




The film also manages to be radically pro-woman without being in the least bit anti-male. And will therefore give young women and men a reason to believe in themselves and their own capacity. There’s good reason for them to think this. Indeed, President Trump might be shocked to learn that parts of real-life Africa, like the fictional Wakanda, are rapidly becoming centers of high-tech innovation.



Some of the biggest tech companies, including Google and Facebook, have expanded their offices to Africa. African companies and entrepreneurs (from Kenya, Nigeria and elsewhere) are global leaders in facilitating e-commerce and internet access. In fact, today there are 314 active tech hubs in 93 countries across Africa.



And in the US, African immigrants employ large numbers of American workers in startups and projects in local tech hubs from coast to coast. In fact, Nigerian immigrants are better educated than white Americans — by far.


According to the US Census Bureau, 43% of African immigrants have college degrees, compared with 23% of the general US population. And nearly two-thirds of Nigerian immigrants in particular have earned college degrees.

They are part of the rising generation of both African and African-American technologists in the United States.There are so many extraordinary groups right here working to open up opportunities for the people that look like those represented in Wakanda. These groups include AI4All (Artificial Intelligence for All), the Hidden Genius Project, Code 2040 and Black Girls Code — and that’s just a piece of it.



Personally, I had the privilege of founding #YesWeCode with Prince in 2014. The initiative came straight out of Prince’s imagination: What if kids from the hood could upload apps instead of just downloading them? So, we got to work.



#YesWeCode has since partnered with the Opportunity Hub in Atlanta to put together a $6 million scholarship for underrepresented youth to pursue coding and other tech skills at We Can Code IT, Code Fellows, Thinkful, and Treehouse. And in 2017, we were able to support 100 young people to realize their dreams of becoming software developers.



We Americans find ourselves at a pivotal moment. On one hand we have our Commander-in-Chief denigrating the value of African countries and immigrants. On the other hand, a new cadre of forward-thinking creatives in Hollywood have produced a magnum opus of black excellence.



We are in the midst of a battle between Donald Trump’s negative vision of Africa (and African-Americans) and Wakanda’s inspiring one. In this contest, those who are on the side of opportunity and inclusivity, of black technologists and innovation, are winning.


A better future beckons, and it’s closer than you think. — (CNN)


Image result for Van JonesVan Jones is a commentor at CNN and former member of President Obama's administration.

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