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Monday, 11 September 2017 17:32

Amaka Anku: EurAsia Point woman for Africa


Ian Bremmer founded Eurasia Group in 1998.  The organization is devoted exclusively to helping investors and business decision-makers understand the impact of politics on the risks and opportunities in foreign markets. Ian's idea—to bring political science to the investment community and to corporate decision-makers—launched an industry and positioned Eurasia Group to become the world leader in political risk analysis and consulting.


Amaka Anku is a senior analyst in the Africa practice, where she follows West Africa, with a specific focus on Nigeria and Ghana. She analyzes how politics, policy, and markets interact and the short- and long-term ramifications for investors.



Amaka has on-the-ground experience working in 12 different African countries with organizations such as the African Development Bank and the International Crisis Group. From 2011 to 2015, she practiced law in the international arbitration and litigation group of global law firm Shearman & Sterling, LLP, where she represented multinational corporations in multimillion-dollar, cross-border disputes throughout the region.


Amaka is a regular commentator and speaker on Nigerian and African affairs. A native of Enugu, Nigeria, she is fluent in Igbo and French. Amaka holds a bachelor's degree from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and doctor of law degree from Harvard Law School.


Ian Bremmer with Eduard Shevardnadze, then President  of Georgia 1999

 


Euroasia starting with a staff of one based out of a cubicle in the World Policy Institute in New York City, Eurasia Group grew into a company with offices on four continents, providing insight for the world's top corporations and financial institutions. As our name suggests, the firm's original focus was on the emerging states of the former Soviet Union. Since then, we have broadened our expertise to both developed and developing countries in every region of the world, to specific economic sectors, and to the business and investment playing fields of the future.

Nigeria is an interesting country, most of the time her thinking and perspectives are warped and lopsided. In the 21st century of innovations and technology, the country’s minister of technology was promising Nigerians that in the nearest future Nigeria will start producing pencils. While others are assiduously tinkering in space technology, feeding their people plentifully and building modern hospitals – Nigeria is talking about fabricating pencils.



But why is Nigeria lagging behind?  Take a look at quality of her education.



Education is most important component for development and economic growth. But Nigeria is busy lowering her standard of education while importing inferior technology and products from China. 


JAMB for its 2017/18 session has lowered the cut-off marks to 120 for universities and 100 for polytechnics. When concerned Nigerians question their decisions, JAMB insisted that the lower cut-off marks will deter the students from not going abroad for their studies, thereby  conserving foreign exchange. JAMB is not Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) with monetary policy responsibility; its function is to be a standardized test facilitator in educating and training the finest work force.


JAMB a ‘cartel’ bequeathed with responsibility of offering standardized test for admissions into the higher institutions has turned into a mercantile agency that negotiate quality of education as in free market. Yes, I called JAMB a cartel, because it has metamorphosed or rather morphed from an examination agency into an economic arrangement with supposedly fiscal coordination with the government. Educational standard cannot be negotiated or you will pay a price at long run. 



JAMB has also become a social engineering agency that has become a tool for administering of quota system by the manipulation of cut-off marks. This has slowly but gradually introduced the rise and practice of mediocrity at expense of meritocracy. In the finality, mediocrity has fully eclipsed meritocracy in the JAMB sphere of influence.


When I read their reason for lowering cut-off marks, I could not believe what I was reading.  Wonders can never cease happening in Nigeria, so now the value and standard of education must be undermine to conserve foreign exchange that a corrupt politician will readily embezzle. Nigeria has finally lost her senses of making a rightful decision. 


Why will a country deliberately destroy the quality of her education? This is antithesis and antithetical to building a modern nation and economy. JAMB is not aware that with a high standard of education, Nigeria can attract foreign students and that can be a source of earning hard currency for the country.


Before Nigeria began her quest to kill quality of her education in tertiary institutions, she used to be the envy of the world. In those yesteryears Nigerian students and graduates can compete with anybody regardless of their countries.  That was the good old days, when degrees from Nigerian universities carry respect and recognition. 


Not anymore, now there are cut-off marks to appease everybody and every group in Nigeria.  The cut-off marks have been deployed for quota system and affirmative action.  There is no generic cut-off mark for the whole country but different cut-off marks for different states in Nigeria. To further sweeten the pie, a graduating student needs to score 30 percent of the grade point average (GPA) for convocation. This is the end of education.


Nigeria must learn from the words spoken by the former president of Harvard University Derek Bok, “If you think education is expensive try ignorance.”



Image result for emeka chiakweluEmeka Chiakwelu is the Principal Policy Strategist at AFRIPOL. His works have appeared in Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Forbes and many other important journals around the world. His writings have also been cited in many economic books, publications and many institutions of higher learning, including tagteam Harvard Education. www.afripol.org, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

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Nigeria: UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority


GENEVA (25 August 2017) – An ultimatum telling Nigeria’s Igbo minority in the north of the country to flee their homes is of “grave concern”, a group of United Nations human rights experts* has warned.  The experts also deplored a hate song and audio message being circulated on the internet and on social media. The Hausa-language audio message urges northern Nigerians to destroy the property of Igbo people and kill anyone who refuses to leave by 1 October, the same date given in the ultimatum.

“We are gravely concerned about this proliferation of hate messages and incitement to violence against the Igbo and their property, especially considering the previous history of such violence,” the experts said.  “The Government must be vigilant, as hate speech and incitement can endanger social cohesion and threaten peace by deepening the existing tensions between Nigeria’s ethnic communities.”


Click to continue  : UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority

Meet the girls from Anambra state who are representing Nigeria at the Indonesia 2017 world school debate


Four students of the Loretto Special Science School in Anambra state, are currently representing Nigeria in the world school debate in Indonesia. 




The students including  Akwue Frances Chidinma and three others, are now in Bali, Indonesia, where the World School Debate is  in progress.



Accoring to Naij News :" The students left for their all-expense paid event aboard an Etihad Airways flight on July 31, where upon arrival in Bali, they would meet other students at the Indonesia Summer Debate. The event which started on Tuesday, August 1, will run till August 11."

 

Meet the girls from Anambra state who are representing Nigeria at the Indonesia 2017 world school debate

Students representing Nigeria

Meet the girls from Anambra state who are representing Nigeria at the Indonesia 2017 world school debate


According to  the WAEC  2017  rankings, Anambra State  and South-East  states were in  in the top 10 ranking  of Nigeria's 36 states..


Top 10 WAEC 2017 results by state
1. Abia
2. Anambra
3. Edo
4. Imo
5. Bayelsa
6. Rivers
7. Lagos
8. Taraba
9. Enugu
10. Delta

 

Credits :Naij, Chinma Ihenacho, Afripol

A female student from Enugu state Ali Cynthia Chineche has passed her May/June 2017 West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) with flying colours. The student set the record high after she made all A's in her nine subjects. Chineche’s teacher, Austin Chibulu , who was proud of his student’s achievement, took to Facebook to share her result to the world. In his post, Austin noted that he is very proud and happy to have taught a lady with great learning abilities and high intelligence. She attended  Shalom Academy Nsukka, Enugu State.

 

 

Credit: Naij.com

Emeka-Egbuna Chinecherem and Joyce Onubogu both from Anambra State scored the highest results in Nigeria.


The National Common Entrance Examination [NCEE] Board has published the Entrance Exam Cut-Off Mark of Each State for the 2017/18 session and results for examination 2017. The examinations are for prospective students for secondary school education.


The results would be available in all the State Ministries of Education nationwide as well as NECO zonal offices.A total of 80,421 candidates registered for the examination but only 77, 512 candidates sat for the examination.The minister said the general analysis of the result showed that the highest score was 189 out of 200 scored by two candidates.The candidates are Emeka-Egbuna Chinecherem and Joyce Onubogu both from Anambra State while the least score was 4 scored by eight candidates.Mr. Adamu said Queens College, Yaba Lagos was one of the colleges with highest subscription of 5524, while the least subscribed college was FGGC, Monguno Borno State, with only 21 candidates.



Cut-Off Marks For All 36 States Of The Federation

State                               Male                        Female
Abia                                  65                               65
Adamawa                         40                               40
Akwa-Ibom                       63                                63
Anambra                           66                                66
Bauchi                               18                                 182
Benue                                60                                60
Borno                                33                                33
Cross-Rivers                    54                                 54
Delta                                  65                                65
Edo                                    63                                 63
Enugu                               65                                65
Imo                                    66                                66
Jigawa                               37                                 37
Kaduna                             52                                52
Kano                                 34                                34
Katsina                             37                                 37
Kebbi                                35                                35
Kogi                                  61                                 61
Kwara                               62                                 62
Lagos                                65                                 65
Niger                                49                                 49
Ogun                               65                                 65
Ondo                               64                                 64
Osun                               64                                 64
Oyo                                 63                                  63
Plateau                           52                                 52
Rivers                             62                                  62
Sokoto                           15                                   7
Taraba                            19                                   19
Yobe                               20                                  20
FCT-Abuja                    57                                   57
Bayelsa                          51                                   51
Ebonyi                           60                                  60
Ekiti                               62                                  62
Gombe                          37                                  37
Nassarawa                   42                                 42
Zamfara                        14                                  12

British Member of Parliament,  Chi (Chinyelu)  Onwurah,  has declared that she is not a Nigerian but British.  She made this declaration yesterday at the 2017 Caine Prize for African Literature ceremony. She was  was reacting on  Abike Dabiri Erewa’s  congratulatory message on her re-election;  Erewa is President Buhari’s Senior Special Assistant on Foreign Affairs and Nigerians in Diaspora.



Chi Onwurah is a British of Igbo ancestry, who was first elected on the platform of the Labour Party in Newcastle Central seat in the year 2010 and was recently relected.  Just like Chuka Umunna, she is biracial with an Igbo- Nigerian father and English mother. Onwurah was born 12 April 1965  in Wallsend, Newcastle.


Her ethnicity is Igbo , while the country of her Igbo father is Nigeria. She is a British citizen not Nigerian.



“After Chi was born in Wallsend, Newcastle upon Tyne, in 1965, her family moved to Awka,Nigeria when she was still a baby. Just two years later the Biafran Civil War broke out bringing famine with it, forcing her mother to bring the children back to Newcastle, whilst her father stayed on in the Biafran army.”


Despite Nigerian government eagerness  to claim Onwurah and her colleagues with  message of congratulations on  being elected,  She insisted  that she is British and not Nigerian.


She reminded Nigerian government :  "I was born in Wallsend, grew up on Hillsview Avenue in Kenton and went to Kenton School before studying Electrical Engineering in London. I have lived in many different cities around the world, without ever for a moment forgetting where I am from: Newcastle. My values and beliefs were formed in Newcastle based on the people I grew up with and my own experiences."



Onwurah obtained her first degree in Electrical Engineering from Imperial College London and subsequently her MBA at Manchester Business School.


Professor Chukwuma Soludo, erstwhile  Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria, CBN  said  that by 2050  Nigeria’s economy will be ahead of France and the United Kingdom, UK.  He made this prediction yesterday at an event organised  by the U.S. Consulate General, Lagos to celebrate  the 241 independence anniversary of the United States of America,


Soludo in his own words:
"So  if we get our acts together especial economically, Nigeria will by 2050 be ahead of France and the UK in terms of economy. But the big question is if we can get our acts together to begin. This is a responsibility for all Nigerians.”’  


Soludo acknowledged that “no country comes fully made; every country is a product of continuous struggle by the citizens to make a more perfect union. What creates a good society, in fact institutions don’t just emerge from heaven, and institutions are products of struggle.


The next Nigeria must be everything that the first Nigeria has not been and that is trying to be, in a process of creating a more perfect and prosperous nation. And I will dare to say a more united country trying to forge a nation out of the disparate nationalities. This won’t be easy because it will require a lot of dialogue, contestations but I think where there’s a will, there will always be a way. We already have the human and natural resources. “



Emeka Chiakwelu at AFRIPOL, said "Soludo maybe rightly optimistic with his liberal assertions. But Nigeria must start with small and realistic dreams . First and foremost feed your people and provide them with livable amenities before going to the moon."

RESULTS ARE coming in from  British Newcastle-upon-Tyne Central election, which can reveal that Labour’s Chi Onwurah has been re-elected.


Chi Onwurah is a British of  Igbo Nigerian ancestry, who was initially  elected on the platform of the Labour Party in Newcastle Central seat in the year 2010. Just like Chuka Umunna, she is biracial with an Igbo- Nigerian father and English mother. Onwurah was born 12 April 1965  in Wallsend, Newcastle.

Here are the results in full.


Chi Onwurah (Lab) 24,071 (64.89%, +9.88%)
Steve Kyte (C) 9,134 (24.62%, +5.73%)
Nick Cott (LD) 1,812 (4.88%, -1.44%)
David Muat (UKIP) 1,482 (4.00%, -10.87%)
Peter Thomson (Green) 595 (1.60%, -3.31%)
Lab maj 14,937 (40.27%)
2.07% swing C to Lab
Electorate 55,571; Turnout 37,094 (66.75%, +9.29%)
2015: Lab maj 12,673 (36.12%) - Turnout 35,085 (57.46%) Onwurah (Lab) 19,301 (55.01%); Kitchen (C) 6,628 (18.89%); Thompson (UKIP) 5,214 (14.86%); Cott (LD) 2,218 (6.32%); Johnson (Green) 1,724 (4.91%)

Chi Onwurah is election Labour Party MP for Newcastle

About Chi Onwurah -  In her qwn word


I was born in Wallsend, grew up on Hillsview Avenue in Kenton and went to Kenton School before studying Electrical Engineering in London. I have lived in many different cities around the world, without ever for a moment forgetting where I am from: Newcastle. My values and beliefs were formed in Newcastle based on the people I grew up with and my own experiences.



My family
My maternal grandfather was a sheet metal worker in the shipyards of the Tyne during the depression. My mother grew up in poverty in Garth Heads on the quayside. In the fifties she married my father, a Nigerian student at Newcastle Medical School. In 1965 I was born, whilst they were living in Long Benton where my father had a dental practise. I was still a baby when my father took us to live in Awka, Anambra State , Nigeria. .But two years later the Biafran Civil War broke out bringing famine with it and, as described vividly in an Evening Chronicle article in 1968, my mother, my brother and sister and I returned as refugees to Newcastle, whilst my father stayed on in the Biafran army.
This early experience of the impact of war on ordinary families left me with a strong sense of my own good fortune in living in a peaceful parliamentary democracy where it is possible to bring about change without taking up the gun or the sword. I am not a pacifist, I believe that our country is worth defending and fighting for. But we do live in a democracy and, increasingly, there are international institutions at the European and global level to enable us to pursue and defend our legitimate interests through debate and discussion.



My education
I benefited from a comprehensive, inspirational and free education for which I will always be grateful. I attended Hillsview nursery, infants and junior schools. A good start in a good school is critical in determining a child’s experience of education and the opportunities that it can bring. At Hillsview I learnt to enjoy learning, and to think that anything was possible. My mother made sure I understood how lucky I was to be able to walk two hundred yards to a great school when some children had to walk for hours to share a classroom with a hundred others.



At 11 I went to Kenton Comprehensive School. I studied for my O and A levels, but also played for our netball and hockey teams, had my first taste of public speaking and learnt to play the saxophone moderately badly. My education enabled me to hold my own with people from every walk of life, and to earn my living doing something I love, engineering. I want every child in Newcastle to have that opportunity. When I was 17 I was elected Kenton School’s MP in a mock election.



My working life
Newcastle’s great industrial past was my inspiration to become an engineer and I enjoyed a fulfilling career in engineering after I graduated from Imperial College in 1987. I worked in hardware and software development, product management, market development and strategy for a variety of mainly private sector companies in a number of different countries – UK, France, US, Nigeria, Denmark..During this time I also studied for an MBA from Manchester Business School and gained Chartered Engineering status. As an engineer I specialised in building out infrastructure in new markets and standardising wholesale Ethernet access. My last role before entering parliament was as head of Telecoms Technology for Ofcom the Communications Regulator



My interests
I have always campaigned for the causes I believed in. As a student I campaigned against the Federation of Conservative Students at Imperial College. Later I was very active in the Anti Apartheid Movement, and spent many years on its National Executive, and that of its successor organisation, ACTSA. Anti apartheid was one of the most successful popular movements ever and undermines the claims of those that believe real people are never interested in politics. People are interested in the politics that matters to them. Before being selected as Labour’s candidate for Newcastle I was on the Advisory Board of the Open University Business School, reflecting my belief in educational opportunity at every stage in life and for every level of ability.
Outside of politics and work I enjoy music, reading and long walks in the countryside.

"Iam proud to be an Igbo"


A Nigerian American super student,  Ifeoma Thorpe  -   17-year-old New Jersey teenager, has been accepted by all eight Ivy League schools this year — Brown, Columbia, Dartmouth, Yale, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard. Ifeoma and her parents were immigrants living in New Jersey USA and they were originally from South east Nigeria.

Ifeoma won’t officially graduate from Morris Hills High School until June, and as of now she isn’t quite sure which school she’ll choose. The high school senior recently told ABC NY, “I got into Harvard early action so I figured I’ll just go there, so then I got into all the others and I was like, wait now I don’t know where I want to go.”

Image result for ifeoma white-thorpe

"I was like, oh my gosh, oh my gosh, like this might be eight out of eight and I clicked it and it said 'Congratulations' and I was like oh my goodness!" Ifeoma  told CNN affiliate WABC-TV.


Ifeoma Hopes to Become a Cardiologist One Day


She wants to study biology and pursue a career in global health. Since all of the Ivy League schools "have great research facilities," she decided to apply to them all.

She is also Winner of SELMA Speech and Essay Contest

The winners of the National Liberty Museum’s SELMA Speech and Essay Contest, supported by the John Templeton Foundation in partnership with Paramount Pictures, were announced on April 21, 2015. In the year that marked the 50th anniversary of the Selma march, the top prize was awarded jointly to two teens, who each received the $5,000 Grand Prize at a ceremony in Philadelphia. The ceremony included a keynote speech from former U.S. Senator Harris Wofford, an original Selma marcher and advisor to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Image result for ifeoma white-thorpe

 

Students getting into all of the Ivies is a monumental feat, but it's happened to a handful of teens over the past couple of years -- Kwasi Enin in 2014, Harold Ekeh in 2015 and Augusta Uwamanzu-Nna and Kelly Hyles last year.

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