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Nigeria: UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority


GENEVA (25 August 2017) – An ultimatum telling Nigeria’s Igbo minority in the north of the country to flee their homes is of “grave concern”, a group of United Nations human rights experts* has warned.  The experts also deplored a hate song and audio message being circulated on the internet and on social media. The Hausa-language audio message urges northern Nigerians to destroy the property of Igbo people and kill anyone who refuses to leave by 1 October, the same date given in the ultimatum.

“We are gravely concerned about this proliferation of hate messages and incitement to violence against the Igbo and their property, especially considering the previous history of such violence,” the experts said.  “The Government must be vigilant, as hate speech and incitement can endanger social cohesion and threaten peace by deepening the existing tensions between Nigeria’s ethnic communities.”


Click to continue  : UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority

For the first time since its publication in 2014, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists will be translated into Myanmar language.



Adapted from Adichie’s 2012 TedX talk of the same name, We Should All Be Feminists is a book-length essay. Through personal anecdotes and societal analyses, Adichie explores what the word “feminism” means, and asserts that the word “feminist” is not a negative term and that in fact, it should be embraced by all. The book garnered positive reviews from critics and scholars worldwide, and spent months on the New York Times bestseller list.



In 2015, Sweden announced that a copy of We Should All Be Feminists would be distributed to every 16-year-old high school student in the country. In it, Adichie writes, “My own definition of a feminist is a man or a woman who says, ‘Yes, there’s a problem with gender as it is today and we must fix it, we must do better.”



For the woman behind the Myanmar translation, Nandar Gyawalli, the book, which serves as her translational debut, holds a great deal of personal significance. “I remember sitting on the floor and reading the book [for the first time], and I could relate to most of the things the author described. For a moment, it felt like I was reading about myself or something I have longed to express,” Nandar told Coconuts. Growing up in Myanmar, Nandar encountered a number of people who didn’t believe that gender issues even existed in the country, and consequentially, that feminism was a topic worth discussing. Frustrated, Nandar took the initiative and began translating Adichie’s book last December while she was still a student.



“It is quite frustrating when people, especially people you love and care about, don’t see these problems as problems,” she explained. “I was determined to translate it into Burmese language because I personally believe that this book will help many people to become aware of different forms of gender discrimination and think differently.”



The translation took around four months to complete, and afterward, Nandar was stuck with the problem of getting it published — an area in which she had little expertise. Through a post in the “Yangon Feminists Bookclub” Facebook group, Nandar connected with May Htut Pan Moe, the publications manager at Mote Oo Education. May read a copy of the translation for the first time during her Thingyan holiday and decided it was worth publishing.




Nandar’s translation of We Should All Be Feminists is clear and accessible — a conscious decision on the translator’s part. “The author wrote the book in a very personal and simple way, so I tried to make the translation as simple as I could. I want everyone who can read Burmese to read the book,” Nandar explained. Despite the simplicity of Adichie’s language, there were still certain words and terms that proved tricky to translate. Nandar pointed out that translating the historical context and “jargon” of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act was particularly difficult.

Image result for Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s ‘We Should All Be Feminists’ translated to Burmese (Myanmar)

The translation of the word “feminist” — which is obviously central to the book’s message — also prompted debate. In her essay, Adichie writes, “Some people ask: ‘Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?’ Because that would be dishonest.” Keeping the author’s message in mind, Nandar contemplated how exactly to translate such a key and loaded term.



“Before I decided to use the words “feminist” [and “feminism”], I talked with different authors and poets about the word,” Nandar said. Unable to locate a Myanmar language term that was the perfect equivalent of the word “feminist” and unhappy with making a literal translation of the term, Nandar finally made the decision to simply spell out the word in Burmese.



As for her next project, Nandar hopes to translate another Adichie work that she believes is “another important book that should be introduced in Burma.” She said: “If I get the chance, I would really love to translate Dear Ijeawele, Or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions.”



The official book launch of the Myanmar-language edition of We Should All Be Feminists will take place this Friday (August 18) at Myanm/Art Gallery from 6-9pm. Nandar will also moderate a panel discussion between Peter Chan Min Sang, a philosophy teacher at the Pre-Collegiate Program of Yangon; Htar Htar, the founder and director of Akhaya Women; and Dr. Thet Su Htwe, the founder of Strong Flowers Sexuality Education Services.

The small Nigerian town of Nnewi has more naira billionaires per capita than anywhere else in the country.


Shortly before Nigeria’s independence in 1960, Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu, reportedly Nigeria’s first black billionaire, and founding president of the Nigerian Stock Exchange, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. The royal honor came after he helped the British during World War II with his fleet of trucks. He was so wealthy that during the Queen’s visit in 1956, she was chauffeured around in his Rolls-Royce – apparently the only one in the country at the time – on the request of the colonial administration.




Profiled in September 1965 by TIME magazine, Ojukwu made his money by importing dried fish for resale, and diversifying into textiles, cement and transport. When he died a year later, his wealth was an estimated $4 billion in today’s economic value.


His son, Chukwuemeka, who also ended up a billionaire, returned from Oxford University at 22 with a master’s degree in history and led his fellow Igbos into the Nigerian civil war as head of the secessionist state of Biafra in 1967.



Their hometown Nnewi, in the southeastern state of Anambra, either by good fortune or hard work, has bred more naira billionaires than any other town in Nigeria, and possibly Africa. The Igbos, who sometimes refer to themselves as the ‘Jews of Africa’, have entrepreneurship in their blood. They have built themselves from the ground up, with little help from the government, after a controversial policy left them all with 20 pounds each, regardless of their bank balance, at the end of the Nigerian civil war in 1970.



Nicknamed the Japan of Africa, Nnewi is famous as a hub for automobile spare part dealers, and most recently, Innoson, Nigeria’s first indigenous car assembly plant. The town is also known for its factories that manufacture household goods and is home to the biggest road transport companies in the country. Nnewi, with a little over two million residents, is a 30-minute drive from the Onitsha – the biggest outdoor market in West Africa – on the banks of the Niger River.



These are 10 of the most prominent naira billionaires from Nnewi, in no particular order:



Image result for Cletus Ibeto:Cletus Ibeto: The Ibeto Group has been described as the largest industrial enterprise in southeast Nigeria. Starting out as an apprentice to an already established auto spare parts dealer, Ibeto eventually branched out on his own and effectively ended importation of lead acid car batteries in Nigeria in the late 80s. The result is a conglomerate dealing in hospitality, motor products, real estate, petrochemicals, agriculture and cement.




Image result for Cosmas Maduka:Cosmas Maduka: One of the country’s foremost car dealerships, Coscharis Group, is the brainchild of a man who lost his father at four and had to drop out of school to sell bean cakes, a popular food staple. His company, one of the largest car dealerships in Nigeria that deals with BMW, Jaguar, Range Rover and Rolls-Royce, has diversified into agriculture.



Image result for Innocent ChukwumaInnocent Chukwuma: Another school dropout, he is the founder of Innoson Nigeria Limited which produces sport utility vehicles, commercial buses and passenger cars at the first indigenous assembly plant in Nigeria. The company has factories in Nnewi and Enugu and has the governments of Anambra and Enugu states, as well as a few federal agencies, among its customers.



Gabriel Chukwuma: The elder brother of Innoson, Gabriel is invested in sports, real estate and hospitality. As chairman of Gabros International Football Club, he oversaw its rise into the Nigerian Premier League and partnership with English side, West Ham FC before selling to fellow Nnewi entrepreneur, Ifeanyi Ubah. He began business as a patent medicine dealer.




Alexander Chika Okafor: Chicason Industries, and one of its products – A-Z Petroleum, are household names in Nigeria. The conglomerate has made significant inroads in the mining, manufacturing, and real estate in Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Okafor, its founder and chairman, was named in 2011 by the Senate as one of the beneficiaries of the subsidy fraud under the Goodluck Jonathan administration, pocketing as much as N18 billion ($54 million).



Augustine Ilodibe: An orphan and mass server in the Catholic church, young Ilodibe was gifted £35 by one of the priests and he initially invested in motor spare parts trading. By the sixties, he pioneered the interstate luxury bus transport service; for years, he was the sole importer of these buses. After helping organize vehicles for the Biafran side during the civil war, he established the hugely popular Ekene Dili Chukwu Transport, his main cash cow and later diversified into brewery and agriculture.


Ifeanyi Ubah: The flamboyant businessman funded parts of the Goodluck Jonathan campaign ahead of the 2015 presidential polls and unsuccessfully ran for the governorship of his home state, Anambra, in 2014. His wealth comes from investments in oil and gas, as well as exportation of motor spare parts and, recently, from sales of football players. In June 2015, Ubah – described by one Nigerian newspaper as ‘the new sugar daddy of Nigerian football’ – completed the purchase of Gabros FC for N500 million and renamed it Ifeanyi Ubah FC.


Louis Onwugbenu: The head honcho of Louis Carter Industries dropped out of school in 1967 when the Nigerian civil war broke out. He got his nickname from weekly trips to Lagos to sell motor spare parts under the popular Carter Bridge in the city. His reinvested profits allowed him to diversify into manufacturing car batteries and pipe fittings, agriculture, food processing, real estate and, by the age of 30, he was already a naira multimillionaire. The headquarters of his conglomerate sits in the Carter Industrial Estate, spanning many acres in Nnewi.


Obiajulu Uzodike: Nigeria is one of the foremost cable producers in the world due to many indigenous manufacturers across the southeast. One of the top cable companies is Cutix Nigeria, whose founder, Obiajulu Uzodike, cut his teeth in the business as a staff at a US-based aircraft and military wires and accessories company. By 1982, the Harvard Business School alumna and civil war veteran set up Cutix with N400,000 ($1,200), nurturing it to eventually become the first indigenous firm in the southeast to be listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange.

Meet the girls from Anambra state who are representing Nigeria at the Indonesia 2017 world school debate


Four students of the Loretto Special Science School in Anambra state, are currently representing Nigeria in the world school debate in Indonesia. 




The students including  Akwue Frances Chidinma and three others, are now in Bali, Indonesia, where the World School Debate is  in progress.



Accoring to Naij News :" The students left for their all-expense paid event aboard an Etihad Airways flight on July 31, where upon arrival in Bali, they would meet other students at the Indonesia Summer Debate. The event which started on Tuesday, August 1, will run till August 11."

 

Meet the girls from Anambra state who are representing Nigeria at the Indonesia 2017 world school debate

Students representing Nigeria

Meet the girls from Anambra state who are representing Nigeria at the Indonesia 2017 world school debate


According to  the WAEC  2017  rankings, Anambra State  and South-East  states were in  in the top 10 ranking  of Nigeria's 36 states..


Top 10 WAEC 2017 results by state
1. Abia
2. Anambra
3. Edo
4. Imo
5. Bayelsa
6. Rivers
7. Lagos
8. Taraba
9. Enugu
10. Delta

 

Credits :Naij, Chinma Ihenacho, Afripol

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  • UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority
    Nigeria: UN experts denounce ultimatum and death threats targeting Igbo minority
    GENEVA (25 August 2017) – An ultimatum telling Nigeria’s Igbo minority in the north of the country to flee their homes is of “grave concern”, a group of United Nations human rights experts* has warned.  The experts also deplored a hate song and audio message being circulated on the internet and on social media. The Hausa-language audio message urges northern...
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    For the first time since its publication in 2014, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists will be translated into Myanmar language.



    Adapted from Adichie’s 2012 TedX talk of the same name, We Should All Be Feminists is a book-length essay. Through personal anecdotes and societal analyses, Adichie explores what the word “feminism” means, and asserts that the word “feminist” is not a negative term and...
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HOUSTON °F
ABUJA °F
LAGOS °F
JOHANNESBURG °F
    Ferienhaus Ostsee

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